Resources for

Native plants

Funding

: May 22, 2024

$500 - $1,000

Seed Grants Program

Awards small grants in support of grassroots efforts and community-based environmental work in New England. The Grassroots Fund utilizes participatory grantmaking to move resources to New England grassroots groups working at the intersections of Environmental Justice. The program is geared toward groups who have some experience implementing a project in their community. Grants support groups to deepen their work by further developing a community vision, lowering barriers to participation, identifying new stakeholders, and working to bring more voices and lived experiences into core decision-making processes.

Water Quality
Green Infrastructure
Marine Debris
Waste Management
Wetlands
Community Engagement
Policies & Regulations
Extreme Weather & Storms
Recreation & Access
Planning
Incentive Programs
Infrastructure
Erosion
Stormwater Management
Environmental Justice
Economic Impacts
Aquatic Resources
Sea Level Rise
Environmental Health Hazards
Nature-based Solutions
Land Use
Habitat
Flooding

Funding

: Aug 2 – Nov 1, 2024

Up to $8,000 (Planning); Up to $50,000 (Implementation)

Climate Smart Land Stewardship Grant Program

The Climate Smart Land Stewardship Grants is a new fund for land trusts offered by the Connecticut Land Conservation Council (CLCC) with support from the Connecticut Department of Agriculture. This program will award $500,000 over multiple years for both planning and implementation grants. In 2024, grants will be awarded quarterly.

Habitat
Land Use
Planning

Funding

: Feb 27 – Apr 15, 2024

$1,000-$5,000

Connecticut Botanical Society Small Grants Program

The Small Grants Program provides funding for land conservation projects that provide protection of rare or uncommon native plant species or natural communities, or areas of high native diversity. We will also consider habitat improvement projects, protection of open space in low-income and urban communities, and assistance with fund-raising for projects that meet the above criteria.

Habitat
Land Use

Up to $8,000 (Planning); Up to $50,000 (Implementation)

Climate Smart Land Stewardship Grant Program

The Climate Smart Land Stewardship Grants is a new fund for land trusts offered by the Connecticut Land Conservation Council (CLCC) with support from the Connecticut Department of Agriculture. This program will award $500,000 over multiple years for both planning and implementation grants. In 2024, grants will be awarded quarterly.

Habitat
Land Use
Planning

Website

Level of Effort:

Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group

The Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group website has information on events, invasive plant information for Connecticut, and control information. The mission of the Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group is to gather and convey information on the presence, distribution, ecological impacts, and management of invasive species; to promote uses of native or non-invasive ornamental alternatives throughout Connecticut; and to work cooperatively with researchers, conservation organizations, government agencies, green industries, and the general public to identify and manage invasive species pro-actively and effectively. Organized in 1997 as an ad-hoc group, the Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group (CIPWG) meets 1 to 2 times per year to collaborate and share information about invasive plant issues affecting Connecticut and the region. The group includes federal, state, and town agency staff, researchers, nursery growers, educators, master gardeners, community members, and interested citizens.

Habitat

Funding

: May 22 – Nov 1, 2023

$11,000-$200,000

Invasive Species Grants Program

This grant program, supported by the State Environmental Protection Fund (EPF), is designed to advance projects that target both aquatic and terrestrial invasive species across the state, with six funding categories that address invasive species spread prevention; early detection and rapid response; research; management planning; and education and outreach.

Habitat
Aquatic Resources
Recreation & Access
Community Engagement

Funding

: Jan 31, 2025

$2,000-$10,000

Nassau County Soil and Water Conservation District – Part C Funding

Projects must meet one or more of the follow criteria in Nassau County:
a. Conserve or improve soils
b. Improve water quality of our groundwater and/or surface water
c. Control and prevent soil erosion and/or prevent floodwater and sediment damages
d. Conservation, development, utilization, and disposal of water
e. Preserve, increase, or improve natural resources including trees and plants
f. Control or eliminate invasive plants or wildlife
g. Control and abate NPS water pollution
h. Preserve wildlife

Erosion
Flooding
Habitat
Land Use
Water Quality
Green Infrastructure

Funding

: Mar 1, 2024

$500

Long Island Garden Rewards Program

This program provides financial rewards for homeowners on Long Island who add green alternatives to their properties that reduce stormwater and nitrogen pollution entering Long Island Sound. Homeowners can be reimbursed for installing rain barrels, rain gardens, or native plantings on their properties. Funds are limited and available on a first come, first serve basis.

Nature-based Solutions
Incentive Programs
Green Infrastructure

Funding

: May 22, 2024

Non-monetary Award

Trees for Tribs

NYSDEC’s Trees for Tribs is a statewide program that works to reforest NY’s tributaries and create or improve riparian buffers that decrease erosion, reduce flooding damage, improve wildlife and stream habitat, and protect water quality.

Erosion
Habitat

Funding

: Jan 1 – Apr 15, 2023

~$1,500

EPOC 2022 Environmental Grant Program

The EPOC Grant Program provides non-profit and not-for-profit environmental advocacy groups, community based groups and environmental education organizations funding for local projects that benefit the environment.

Erosion
Flooding
Habitat
Nature-based Solutions
Environmental Health Hazards
Aquatic Resources
Environmental Justice
Stormwater Management
Water Quality
Community Engagement
Wetlands
Green Infrastructure

Funding

: May 4 – Jul 16, 2023

Over $4.5M available, divided by region

Connecticut Wetland Mitigation In Lieu Fee Program Grant

The National Audubon Society, Inc., through its state office, Audubon Connecticut, is the “sponsor” of a Connecticut “In Lieu Fee” (ILF) program. The program allows permittees to pay a fee in lieu of taking on mitigation themselves. Instead, local organizations like land trusts, and other environmental nonprofits, are given the opportunity to apply for and receive grant funding for the preservation, restoration, and enhancement of wetland and watercourse resources and associated upland buffers in the State of Connecticut.

Habitat
Land Use
Nature-based Solutions
Water Quality
Incentive Programs
Wetlands

Funding

: May 22, 2024

Up to $5000

Community Match Fund

Sustainable CT’s Community Match Fund is an innovative program that provides fast, flexible funding and support for engaging your community on wide-ranging sustainability projects. Eligible projects receive dollar-for-dollar matching funds from Sustainable CT.

Stormwater Management
Waste Management
Wetlands
Community Engagement
Policies & Regulations
Extreme Weather & Storms
Recreation & Access
Planning
Incentive Programs
Infrastructure
Water Quality
Erosion
Environmental Justice
Economic Impacts
Aquatic Resources
Sea Level Rise
Environmental Health Hazards
Nature-based Solutions
Land Use
Habitat
Flooding

Funding

: Nov 21 – Feb 8, 2024

max $500,000

DEEP Clean Water Act Section 319 Nonpoint Source Grants

Grants are awarded for projects that address Nonpoint Source impacts in surface waters including creation and implementation of approved Watershed Based Plans.

Stormwater Management
Waste Management
Wetlands
Community Engagement
Policies & Regulations
Extreme Weather & Storms
Recreation & Access
Planning
Infrastructure
Water Quality
Erosion
Environmental Justice
Aquatic Resources
Sea Level Rise
Environmental Health Hazards
Nature-based Solutions
Land Use
Habitat
Flooding

Funding

: Aug 1, 2023

Urban Forested Natural Areas and Riparian Corridor Restoration Grant

Through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, funding is available to address forest health issues, specifically invasive control and restoration of urban forested natural areas and riparian corridors.

Habitat
Land Use
Planning

Funding

: Mar 20 – Sep 17, 2024

$1,000 - $4,000

Grow Grants Program

Awards small grants in support of grassroots efforts and community-based environmental work in New England. The Grassroots Fund utilizes participatory grantmaking to move resources to New England grassroots groups working at the intersections of Environmental Justice. The program is geared toward groups who have some experience implementing a project in their community. Grants support groups to deepen their work by further developing a community vision, lowering barriers to participation, identifying new stakeholders, and working to bring more voices and lived experiences into core decision-making processes.

Water Quality
Green Infrastructure
Marine Debris
Waste Management
Wetlands
Community Engagement
Policies & Regulations
Extreme Weather & Storms
Recreation & Access
Planning
Incentive Programs
Infrastructure
Erosion
Stormwater Management
Environmental Justice
Economic Impacts
Aquatic Resources
Sea Level Rise
Environmental Health Hazards
Nature-based Solutions
Land Use
Habitat
Flooding

Funding

: Dec 31 – Mar 11, 2024

less than $1M

Connecticut Recreational Trails Program

This year, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP)’s Recreational Trails Program will make $10 million available to improve Connecticut’s trail infrastructure, which has seen significant usage increases since the onset of the pandemic. This grant program aims to help support communities managing the trail usage increases that have endured as more residents and visitors become familiar with the more than 2,500 miles of multi-use trails and greenways that crisscross the state.

Habitat
Land Use
Infrastructure
Planning
Community Engagement

Funding

: May 22 – Feb 27, 2024

up to $2,000

The Connecticut Society for Women Environmental Professionals Grant Program

The Connecticut Society for Women Environmental Professionals Grant Program provides funding for local projects in Connecticut that benefit the environment. Grants of up to $2,000 will be awarded. Any application meeting the grant guidelines that is not successful in one cycle may reapply during any following cycle. The applications will be judged based on the environmental benefits of each project, in comparison to others. “Environmental benefits” can vary widely and successful applications have ranged from property clean-ups to environmental education.

Stormwater Management
Marine Debris
Wetlands
Community Engagement
Policies & Regulations
Extreme Weather & Storms
Recreation & Access
Planning
Incentive Programs
Infrastructure
Water Quality
Erosion
Environmental Justice
Economic Impacts
Aquatic Resources
Sea Level Rise
Environmental Health Hazards
Nature-based Solutions
Land Use
Habitat
Flooding

Funding

: May 22 – Oct 24, 2023

$2,500-$65,000

Urban and Community Forestry Planning Grant

The Urban and Community Forestry Planning Grant Program offers funding for municipalities and non-profit organizations to pursue planning projects such as tree inventories, management plans, or other monitoring programs that will help communities to make informed management decisions.

Habitat
Land Use
Environmental Justice
Planning
Recreation & Access
Green Infrastructure

Funding

: Sep 1 – Dec 19, 2023

$75,000-$3M

Coastal Habitat Restoration and Resilience Grants for Tribes and Underserved Communities

$45 million in funding is available for projects that will advance the coastal habitat restoration and climate resilience priorities of tribes and underserved communities under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and Inflation Reduction Act. Through this funding, NOAA will help support community-driven habitat restoration and build the capacity of tribes and underserved communities to more fully participate in restoration activities.

Habitat
Environmental Justice
Wetlands

Funding

: Jun 13 – Jan 10, 2024

$200K - $4M

NERRS Habitat Protection and Restoration BIL Competition

The NOAA National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) Habitat Protection and Restoration Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) Competition will fund designated Reserve agencies and universities to conduct land acquisition and habitat restoration projects that support the NERRS mission. NOAA will strengthen protection of key land and water areas, improve climate resilience, enhance long-term protection of Reserve areas for research and education, and support the habitat protection goals and priorities of the National Coastal Zone Management Act.

Habitat
Land Use
Nature-based Solutions
Planning
Wetlands

Case Study

East Haddam Community Resilience Building Summary of Findings

With support from the Nature Conservancy and Sustainable CT, East Haddam organized a Community Resilience Building process and workshop, the results of which were compiled into this summary. The team engaged with community members to determine the present hazards and vulnerabilities and identify resilient solutions.

Water Quality
Waste Management
Wetlands
Community Engagement
Policies & Regulations
Funding/Grants
Extreme Weather & Storms
Recreation & Access
Infrastructure
Erosion
Stormwater Management
Aquatic Resources
Sea Level Rise
Nature-based Solutions
Land Use
Habitat
Flooding

Case Study

Hoffman Evergreen Preserve

This Avalonia and Sea Grant effort in Stonington, CT restored the preserve using native, well-researched plant species that would thrive in the forest and offer biodiversity. First, the area was cut down precisely to allow for new, ground-level growth. Then the preserve was seeded with plants chosen by the field team.

Land Use
Nature-based Solutions
Community Engagement

Case Study

Dodge Paddock/Beal Preserve

This public greenspace was suffering from mosquito overpopulation, invasion from Phragmites, and poor tidal/stormwater drainage. The Wetland’s Habitat and Mosquito Management Program (WHAMM) created a new drainage area and tunnels, while also eliminating invasive plants. Then organizations and volunteers banded together to remove and replace invasive plant species with native plants.

Flooding
Land Use
Nature-based Solutions
Sea Level Rise
Extreme Weather & Storms
Community Engagement
Wetlands

Case Study

Coastal Forest Restoration at Otter Creek Preserve

Otter Creek Preserve is located along a three-mile stretch of coastline on Long Island Sound in Mamaroneck, NY. It contains 90% of the remaining productive salt marshes in Westchester County, and is an important site for migratory birds, marine life, and other wildlife. The 35-acre preserve is the largest privately-owned tidal wetland designated and protected as a nature sanctuary in Westchester County.

Following improvements made to the coastal forest and tidal marsh in 2015 and 2016 with support from the Westchester Community Foundation, in 2017 Westchester Land Trust (WLT) received NFWF LISFF funding to continue removing non-native trees, shrubs, and vines, replant with native species, and conduct expanded outreach and educational programming at the preserve.

Habitat

Case Study

Sunken Meadow State Park Restoration

Increased development and the historic construction of a dam on Sunken Meadow Creek in the 1950’s led to reduced tidal exchange, increased water levels in the creek, poor water quality, and the proliferation of invasive species. In 2008 a number of partners (NYS OPRHP, NOAA, NYSDEC, LISS, TNC, Save the Sound, USFWS, LI Botanical Society) came together to work to restore the degraded marsh habitat around Sunken Meadow Creek, increase tidal flow, improve aquatic organism passage, limit invasives, and improve water quality. A restoration feasibility study was completed in 2010. In 2012 Superstorm Sandy blew out the dam on Sunken Meadow Creek, naturally kick-starting restoration. Following Superstorm Sandy, the project partners were able to quickly capitalize on available funding and grants, due to their prior planning efforts. A bridge was built across the Creek where the dam blew out, salt marsh habitat was restored at three locations, green infrastructure was installed in one of the parking areas to capture and treat stormwater runoff, fish passage feasibility on the creek was investigated, and education and outreach was conducted to thousands of people. These projects were completed in 2019. Now, with funding through Long Island Sound Futures Fund, Audubon NY is leading a large-scale marsh restoration project at Sunken Meadow Creek to restore important high-marsh habitat for at risk species, like the Saltmarsh Sparrow, and to increase the resilience of the marsh in the face of rising sea levels. Audubon will be working to finalize the designs and secure permits over the next two years, with on-the-ground restoration expected in 2026.

Flooding
Habitat
Nature-based Solutions
Water Quality
Recreation & Access
Wetlands

Case Study

Maidstone Landing Bluff Restoration

The Maidstone Landing Association, situated between Town of Riverhead Iron Pier Beach and Hallock State Park, wanted to take action to mitigate erosion of their bluff. First they worked with Town of Riverhead to put up signage and fencing to stop beachgoers from climbing and driving on or near the bluff, which was causing significant destruction. Next they opted for a small-scale, nature-based approach to help stabilize the bluff. They purchased snow fencing from Home Depot and native beachgrass from Long Island Natives. They engaged Riverhead Charter High School to help with putting up the snow fencing and the plantings. The Maidstone Landing Association is using their bluff as an “outdoor classroom” to teach students and the public about the importance of conserving our coastal habitats and best practices.

Erosion
Habitat
Nature-based Solutions

Case Study

Scudders Pond Subwatershed Improvements

The Hempstead Harbor Protection Committee and Village of Sea Cliff completed subwatershed improvements at Scudders Pond to address stormwater drainage problems impacting the water quality of the pond and Hempstead Harbor, highlighted as a priority in the 1998 Hempstead Harbor Water Quality Improvement Plan. The improvements included dredging the pond, installing a hydrodynamic separator to intercept sediment, removing invasive Phragmites australis and replacing with native plants, realigning the stream to reduce erosion, redirecting the stormwater from residences to the bioswale, creation of a biofilter wetland area, replacement of the weir between the upper and lower ponds and weir at Shore Road.

Habitat
Nature-based Solutions
Aquatic Resources
Stormwater Management
Water Quality
Infrastructure
Wetlands

Case Study

Restoring Coastal Grassland at the William Cullen Bryant Preserve

The Nassau County Museum of Art restored coastal grassland and use the restored grassland to educate visitors about the environment at the William Cullen Bryant Preserve, Roslyn Harbor, New York. The project will restore an important coastal habitat of Long Island Sound. The whole area was seeded mid-October 2023 and the meadow will start to grow in the spring though it will be 2-3 years before it looks like a meadow.

Habitat
Land Use

Case Study

Rain Gardens on Western Waterfront

Friends of the Bay installed two raingardens at the Western Waterfront, which was done in October 2021 with the help of volunteers.

Nature-based Solutions
Stormwater Management
Water Quality
Green Infrastructure

Case Study

Norwalk, CT

Webster Street Parking Lot Green Infrastructure Project

In 2019, the City of Norwalk secured a LIS Future Fund grant to install green infrastructure in the Webster Street Parking to reduce the impacts of stormwater on the Norwalk River and Harbor and mitigate local flooding of surrounding businesses through the installation of four different types of infiltration and bio-retention structures:
1) Underground infiltration systems.
2) Retention basins and curb inlet planters in eight different areas.
3) Porous pavement with storage in two areas.
4) Infiltration gutters and tree filters in two other areas.

Flooding
Stormwater Management
Infrastructure
Green Infrastructure

Case Study

Stratford, CT

Restoration of the Great Meadows Marsh

This project restored 46 acres of the Great Meadows Marsh in Connecticut that was degraded from dredge material that was dumped on site, poor drainage, and sea level rise. The marsh was also overrun with invasive plants and mosquitoes. A controlled fire was started to kill the invasive reeds growing in the marsh. Then a construction crew removed invasive plants and the dumped dredge material. Lastly, channels were carefully dug for tidal flushing which will allow the marsh to keep pace with sea level rise. Soil hummocks were constructed for Salt Marsh Sparrow habitat. Now the area continues to be monitored, assessed for resiliency, and provides a field for innovative solutions to be tested in.

Partners

Trustees: USFWS, NOAA, State of Connecticut; Project Partners: Audubon Connecticut, Town of Stratford

Habitat
Nature-based Solutions
Sea Level Rise
Recreation & Access
Community Engagement
Wetlands

Case Study

Stratford, CT

Stratford Point Living Shoreline & Tidal Wetland Restoration

This project consists of 750 feet of shoreline in Stratford, CT. The goal of the project was to protect the beach from coastal erosion and to help combat sea level rise. The steps consisted of adding a smooth cordgrass marsh, artificial shellfish reefs (reef balls), high marsh, and a coastal dune area. The site was awarded the “Best Restored Shore Area” from the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. To adaptively manage the site, a second restoration project is being developed to extend the marsh seaward by 0.35 acres over an additional 250 feet of shore using a combination of bagged slipper shell and small, modular oyster castles near the marsh edge, along with additional cordgrass plantings in the intertidal zone.

Project Lead:

Sacred Heart University

Erosion
Habitat
Nature-based Solutions
Aquatic Resources
Wetlands

Case Study

Wilton, CT

Strong Pond Dam Removal at Merwin Meadows

Dana Dam (aka Strong Pond Dam) at Merwin Meadows Park in Wilton, CT was the first barrier to upstream fish migration from Long Island Sound on the Norwalk River. A series of dams along the Norwalk River (historically, and presently) prevented fish from reaching their historic spawning grounds, have posed safety risks, and disconnected the river from its natural floodplain. On September 11, 2023, demolition of this dam began! In addition to restoring habitat and allowing fish passage, the removal restored natural floodplain connectivity, realigned 200 feet of river channel away from an active railroad embankment, and removed a known safety hazard.

Partners

  • Save the Sound, CT DEEP, Trout Unlimited, Town of Wilton

Flooding
Habitat
Aquatic Resources

Case Study

New Haven, CT

New Haven Bioswales

The City of New Haven has installed 286 right-of-way bioswales throughout the city as part of a multifaceted approach to reducing flooding in the downtown area. Right-of-way bioswales are engineered planted areas that are located on sidewalks. They are designed to capture and infiltrate stormwater into the ground that would otherwise directly enter a storm drain. These bioswales were installed as the result of various partnerships and funding opportunities related to flood prevention, localized drainage solutions, combined sewer overflow mitigation, research, and traffic calming projects.

Project Lead

City of New Haven, Dept of Engineering

Project Partners

Urban Resources Initiative, EMERGE Inc., Save the Sound, Yale School of the Environment, and Quinnipiac University, among others.

Flooding
Nature-based Solutions
Stormwater Management
Water Quality
Green Infrastructure

Website

Level of Effort:

CLEAR: Rain Garden App

A website and a downloadable app for your mobile device. The resource has information about rain gardens, designing, selecting plants, and installing a garden on your property.

Habitat
Nature-based Solutions
Stormwater Management
Water Quality

Guidance Tool

Level of Effort:

Long Island Nitrogen Action Plan : Reduce Nitrogen Pledge

10 Things You Can Do to Reduce Personal Nitrogen Pollution

Water Quality

Website

Level of Effort:

Westchester County Native Plant information

Click through all the pages to find guidance on native vs non-native plants, where to buy native plants in Westchester, how to guides, and local ordinances.

Habitat

Guidance Tool

Level of Effort:

Long Island Coastal Bluffs Sign

New York Sea Grant (NYSG) created a new “Protecting Coastal Bluffs of Long Island” Sign (pdf) that is available for municipalities, community groups, homeowner associations and property owners to print and install next to your bluff. NYSG has created a post card version of “Protecting Coastal Bluffs of Long Island” (pdf) available for distribution.

Erosion
Habitat

Incentive Program

Long Island Garden Rewards Program

This program provides financial rewards for homeowners on Long Island who add green alternatives to their properties that benefit the environment. It also provides guidance on how to install green alternatives on your property.

Nature-based Solutions
Stormwater Management
Water Quality
Incentive Programs

Guidance Tool

Level of Effort:

Adapt CT (CTSG & CLEAR) – A Planting Guide for Riparian Sites Along the Connecticut Coast

lists native trees, shrubs, ferns, grasses, sedges, reeds and herbaceous plants suitable for planting along the banks of a river, stream or other body of water.

Nature-based Solutions

Guidance Tool

Level of Effort:

Adapt CT (CTSG & CLEAR) – Native Plants for Riparian Corridors in Connecticut

A guide listing the trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, reeds and herbaceous plants best for the banks of rivers, streams or other bodies of water (a companion to: A Planting Guide for Riparian Sites Along the Connecticut Coast)

Erosion
Habitat
Nature-based Solutions

Guidance Tool

Level of Effort:

Adapt CT (CTSG & CLEAR) – Connecticut Coastal Planting Guide

List of native plants that will grow well in Connecticut’s coastal zone. Includes wildlife and pollinator benefits.

Habitat
Nature-based Solutions

Guidance Tool

Level of Effort:

Adapt CT (CTSG & CLEAR) – Coastal Landscaping Guide for Long Island Sound

Helps shoreline homeowners choose appropriate landscaping options including plant species.

Habitat
Nature-based Solutions

Training

Reimagining Long Island Lawns: Eco-Friendly Practices

On July 18th, 2023 NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and NY Sea Grant hosted a free public webinar to share more about what steps homeowners can take in their own yards to protect and improve Long Island waters! Featured experts from New York Sea Grant, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Commission for Aquifer Protection, Cornell Cooperative Extension Suffolk County, and Rewild Long Island discussed smart fertilizer practices, water conservation, and native plantings.

Habitat
Stormwater Management
Water Quality
Long Island Sound Study Sea Grant NY NYSDEC

Resilience Steps

Connect

LISS
EPA Sea Grant New York Sea Grant Connecticut